CLEO 2015: a great few days!

While the Californian weather was chillier than expected the conference and people were as warm as ever.

I spent last week at CLEO 2015 in San Jose and had a marvellous time. Ruminating on the conference these were the highlights for me:

The plenary sessions included talks by Nobel Prize winners like Shuji Nakamura who helped solve the issues with blue-green LED/laser. One plenary in particular really caught my fancy: “Light’s twist” by Miles Padgett of University of Glasgow. Some of the things he talked about : the orbital angular momentum of light having helical phase fronts which are not be confused with circularly polarised light were fascinating. The fact that unlike the linear Doppler effect, orbital angular momentum would impart the same frequency shift irrespective of the frequency of the light wave was new to me, but when you think about it makes perfect sense. Perhaps the most thought provoking idea was that it is transverse boundary conditions/limitations on the extent of the light beam that lead to the beams such as Airy and Bessel beams, and a waveguide per se is not required. I need to go away and do a lot of reading, but I am excited!

In the “Modes in Fiber” session the talks covered large mode area fiber designs, as well as fabrication, and went on to some very interesting new ideas on quantum walks in multi core fibers. Large mode area fibers, as a member of the audience pointed out is not a new born field and there are several designs out there. So what makes a design worthy of attention? I think one of the authors answered this very well in his presentation, SM2L.2, when Deepak Jain spoke of the three factors that are key:

  • the metric used to decide what effective single moded operation
  • loss of the fundamental mode
  • the effective radius or area at which bend loss becomes large

This discussion particularly interested me because it is this sort of perspective setting that is so important for good research. At times one can get lost in the virtual forest of journal and conference papers each of which announce a slightly (or hugely) better performance. Yet what is the process for determining which design is really best and will perhaps become the industry standard? This is where conferences like CLEO that bring members of the community together can help find the answers or set people on the path!

Undoubtedly the most exciting talk of the session was SM2L.4 by Peter Mosley from Bath. He showed some exciting simulation and experimental results for multicore fibers, whose propagation constant differences were reconstructed by a Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation, a statistical approach. The striking thing was the difference between the classical behavior one might see (when a particle moves through an array with equal probability of moving left or right) and the non-classical behavior they demonstrated for a photon between coupled.

To me the highlight of Tuesday was the Women in Photonics Lunch that had two very high profile speakers: Prof. Michal Lipson of Cornell University and Dr. Hong Liu, principle engineer at Google Technical Infrastructure. These ladies gave very frank and honest insights into their career paths, the challenges they have faced specific to them being female and their advice for women in general.

When Michal said that people at times assume she works for Alex Gaeta, her husband and also a professor at Cornell, but never the other way round, it produced a wave of a laughter and nods of recognition at what so many women face: being talked over at meetings, being mistaken for the secretary etc. The sub-text or unspoken messages that women are given, of their careers being secondary to their male partner’s or colleagues were all realities that many present in the room could empathise with and perhaps you can too as you read it.

Their advice which works for both women and men contained some real nuggets. For example, “don’t put yourself down because the people around you do that to you”. This action of not internalizing the negative messages from those around us sounds very simple but can be very profound. They also advised everyone to set a high personal standard for oneself. Achieving to a high standard then means we feel more confident and feel we belong and deserve the success that we will hopefully achieve!

I cant end the post without talking a little bit about the great talk by Ayman Abouraddy from CREOL, Florida, who gave an invited talk Wednesday morning. He discussed in a very simple and engaging manner the challenges with making multimaterial chalcogenide fibers. He then went on to explain how using polymers in the process his group had overcome these challenges to fabricate  large index difference, small diameter, robust fibers with low bend loss. It wasn’t that the Science being explained was necessarily completely new to me, but a good review of the field coupled with very accessible explanations of the challenges and their solutions was valuable. A 30 minute talk allowed me to walk away feeling I have a good handle on the latest on the field of mid IR fibers. So time well spent!

Now that I am back in London, I am hitting the papers hard and hope to use my time at CLEO well, and planning for next year’s CLEO.

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